How This Roller Coaster Was Literally Designed to Kill You

How This Roller Coaster Was Literally Designed to Kill You


This video is made possible by Skillshare, home to over 17,000 classes that could teach you a new life skill. Get your first 3 months for just 99 cents when you sign up using the link below. If you’ve ever been to an amusement park before, then you’ve probably ridden on a roller coaster. Roller coasters are fun and a good way to experience what feels like a near-death experience without actually having to die in the process. But one man named Julijonas Urbonas decided that he wanted to change all of that. Eight years ago in 2010, he designed this monstrosity and affectionately named it the Euthanasia Coaster. If you’ve ever played a Rollercoaster Tycoon game and designed a ride to fail and blow up on purpose, then this is kind of like the real-life version of that. To start things off the train on the ride is capable of loading 24 passengers on board. Once that’s been done the train would ascend a steep lift to a crazy height of 510 meters in the sky. To put that into perspective, the tallest rollercoaster ever built so far is the King Da Ka in Six Flags Great Adventure in New Jersey and, that’s only 139 meters tall. The Euthanasia Coaster would be well over three times taller than even that, which is just a little bit shorter than the One World Trade Center in New York City, the tallest building in the United States. It would take the train going up the lift a full two minutes to reach the top, which would give the riders time to contemplate their decision of getting on the thing. Seeing the surface and buildings below get smaller and smaller would undoubtedly be a terrifying experience. And knowing that death would follow upon dropping down the other side would increase the tension felt by many. Once at the top, the train would stop and allow anybody who wanted to get off the option to leave and descend back down to the surface safely. Everybody remaining on the train would have to manually push a button committing to the ride. And then the rest of the experience would begin. The train would plummet over the side of the hill hurtling down at a speed of 360 km/h, close to its terminal velocity. After the 500 meter initial drop, the track flattens out and begins the first of seven inversions in a row, and this is the deadly part. It would take 60 seconds for the train to go through all seven of these inversions and each inversion gradually gets a smaller and smaller diameter in order to maintain 10 Gs of force to all the passengers during the entire 60-second experience. To understand just how much of a force that really is, here’s a little bit of further context: If you’re standing on the surface at sea level, then you’re currently experiencing about 1 G of force. If you accelerate from 0 to 60 miles per hour in 2.4 seconds in a Bugatti Veyron, you’d experience 1.55 Gs. If you were on a space shuttle during launch you’d experience 3Gs. Driving a Formula One car around a sharp lateral turn would give you a taste of 6.5 Gs. And even the astronauts aboard Apollo 11 during reentry with Earth’s atmosphere only experienced a force of 7.19 Gs. So here’s what would happen to you experiencing 10 Gs for 60 seconds flying through the inversions on this death coaster. You would gradually begin experiencing worsening cases of cerebral hypoxia. Meaning that your blood would rush to the lower parts of your body, and so your brain wouldn’t be getting enough oxygen to survive. The first thing that you would notice is your vision graying out, which would then gradually turn into tunnel vision. From there, you would begin experiencing a blackout and, ultimately you would eventually lose consciousness and die. While it sounds extremely morbid, Julijonas Urbonas designed the Euthanasia Coaster for exactly what its name implies. Euthanasia, while undoubtedly a madman, he designed the coaster with the intent to give people with horrifically painful diseases or incurable conditions the ability to end their lives with a painless and euphoric experience. Some exceptionally robust people may even be able to survive the entire experience, which would undoubtedly leave a lasting memory. But either way, this is one ride that you’ll probably never be able to experience. The Euthanasia Coaster has always just been an art concept and a testament to the lengths of human imagination, where it should probably remain. If you want to learn how to design your own crazy rollercoaster, you’ll need to know how to draw a blueprint, which you can learn in courses like this one on Skillshare.com As you’ve heard before on this channel, Skillshare is an incredible place to learn what you want to learn because they have over 17,000 classes about anything you’re curious to learn about. They even have a class taught by friends at Kurzgesagt about how to animate videos on YouTube just like they do. A premium membership to Skillshare gives you unlimited access to all of these classes. Which you can also download for offline viewing on your mobile device when you need to. If you want to start learning how to animate your own videos or start your own business, you can get Skillshare premium for three months for only $0.99 by clicking the link in the description or by going to skl.sh/rll99

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